Two ends of a level created separately and then connected?

CuddlyTageCuddlyTage Posts: 14
edited February 2010 in Levels
I'm working using torched on a school project two of my team members are working on the beginning and thin end of the level at the same time. They plan to save all of their folders used in level creation and put them into a folder A and a folder B encasing the two parts. Then plan to open both on the same map and move them to sync up.

What problems if any should they expect to face. I know personally when selecting a large amount of assets and moving them in mass, they don't all move at the same rate. I'm also worried that the A & B files will simply not open from being to large.

Problems, expectations, advice, tips etc. please.
"food is always has, time and place" -noah lape-

Comments

  • prestigeprestige Posts: 553
    Are you planning to merge (or layout link) one layout into the other? As far as I know that should work. I don't know how you'd be affected by levels being too large; I haven't run into such problems. Of course, all my levels have been relatively small.

    Have you considered making each part a separate chunk and having the game assemble them? I guess it would be a hassle to reconfigure your maps for that now.
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  • school sounds like it has become pretty awesome nowadays if you get to play Torchlight for a project.
  • I'm not sure I follow what you're doing.

    Three of you are collaborating to make one giant, non-randomized dungeon level, is that right? I'm not sure why you're using multiple folders, so maybe I'm way off.

    If the level gets really huge then your framerate may get pretty low on the editing machine, and it could crash if you run out of memory. It really depends on the size of the level and the how powerful your machine is. My old laptop can deal with complicated levels several times the size of a normal chunk without too many problems.

    One thing you can do is have each person work on a layout that has the other two people's layouts loaded as layout links and positioned correctly. Then you can work on your section and see how it meets up with the others, and whenever they update their files you can just drop them into your folder and the changes will show up in the room you're working on.
  • Volbard wrote:
    I'm not sure I follow what you're doing.

    Three of you are collaborating to make one giant, non-randomized dungeon level, is that right? I'm not sure why you're using multiple folders, so maybe I'm way off.

    If the level gets really huge then your framerate may get pretty low on the editing machine, and it could crash if you run out of memory. It really depends on the size of the level and the how powerful your machine is. My old laptop can deal with complicated levels several times the size of a normal chunk without too many problems.

    One thing you can do is have each person work on a layout that has the other two people's layouts loaded as layout links and positioned correctly. Then you can work on your section and see how it meets up with the others, and whenever they update their files you can just drop them into your folder and the changes will show up in the room you're working on.

    I did this recently with a level full of a ton of scripted puzzles and moving objects. I found that it does indeed slow down the editor when you try to view everything at once. But it wouks well enough to just fit the layouts together as layout links, then when you move the camera, just look straight down until you get to your location.
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