How to understand the skill expression

BattyBatty Posts: 5
edited November 2015 in TL2 General Discussions
Hi everyone,
I'm new here and I just want to know more about the skill expression. For example, when the skill reads as: Frost Wave--- 92% chance to Freeze for 7 seconds 8862 ice Damage over 7 seconds. So what I want to ask here is that, the "for" and "over" means the same as "last" 7 seconds but used in differenct sentence for grammar's sake or something else?
Any tips would be appreciated :?:

Comments

  • gytfunkegytfunke Posts: 571
    Hey Batty,

    '8000 damage over 7 seconds' is more clear than '8000 damage for 7 seconds'. The second sentence could be ambiguous. The first very clearly means it deals 8000 damage total and takes 7 seconds to do all 8000 damage.
  • BattyBatty Posts: 5
    gytfunke wrote:
    Hey Batty,

    '8000 damage over 7 seconds' is more clear than '8000 damage for 7 seconds'. The second sentence could be ambiguous. The first very clearly means it deals 8000 damage total and takes 7 seconds to do all 8000 damage.

    Thanks for the fast reply, could you please be kind to explain the second sentence about what different meanings will it bring(since you said "ambiguous")? Forgive me being geek here :twisted:
    Frost Wave--- 92% chance to Freeze for 7 seconds; What if I use 92% chance to Freeze over 7 seconds, what's the difference then? :o
  • SerkevanSerkevan Posts: 1,586
    It doesn't really make sense in that case; it would probably mean that the affected target would have a 92% to freeze 7 seconds after being hit... or is gradually "getting frozen", or something like that. My English is not that good.
  • NeophytoiNeophytoi Posts: 3,539
    Serkevan wrote:
    My English is not that good.

    It's better than mine, Serk :)

    Batty wrote:
    Frost Wave--- 92% chance to Freeze for 7 seconds; What if I use 92% chance to Freeze over 7 seconds, what's the difference then?

    As per Serkevan, it's all about conditionality.
    Serkevan wrote:
    It doesn't really make sense in that case; it would probably mean that the affected target would have a 92% to freeze 7 seconds after being hit... or is gradually "getting frozen"...

    In the first case, the condition is "there's a 92% chance that a single hit will freeze a target for a total of 7 seconds." In the second case, the condition is "there's a 92% chance to freeze a target at any time within 7 seconds following a target hit."

    The first case is probably what you're striving for, but the second case is probably the more interesting effect simply because of the potential variability :)
    never let your hatred of people who would bar you from the Inviolable House of Worship lead you into the sin of aggression: but rather help one another in furthering virtue and ****-consciousness, and do not help one another in furthering evil and enmity
  • BattyBatty Posts: 5
    Serkevan wrote:
    It doesn't really make sense in that case; it would probably mean that the affected target would have a 92% to freeze 7 seconds after being hit... or is gradually "getting frozen", or something like that. My English is not that good.

    :D
    Grammar sometimes can be a confusion.
  • BattyBatty Posts: 5
    Neophytoi wrote:
    Serkevan wrote:
    My English is not that good.

    It's better than mine, Serk :)

    Batty wrote:
    Frost Wave--- 92% chance to Freeze for 7 seconds; What if I use 92% chance to Freeze over 7 seconds, what's the difference then?

    As per Serkevan, it's all about conditionality.
    Serkevan wrote:
    It doesn't really make sense in that case; it would probably mean that the affected target would have a 92% to freeze 7 seconds after being hit... or is gradually "getting frozen"...

    In the first case, the condition is "there's a 92% chance that a single hit will freeze a target for a total of 7 seconds." In the second case, the condition is "there's a 92% chance to freeze a target at any time within 7 seconds following a target hit."

    The first case is probably what you're striving for, but the second case is probably the more interesting effect simply because of the potential variability :)

    Thx, I think I get a better understanding about this. :mrgreen:
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